Tag Archives: Crown Graphic

Expired Film Day 2017

Expired Film Day 2017

Expired Film Day 2017

Camera: Graflex Crown Graphic Pacemaker (1955)
Film: Kodak 4×5 T-Max 400 (Expired April 2002)
Process: D-76 (Stock) 6:45 Min @ 20°C
Scanner: Epson Perfection V600 Photo

Old Warehouse - Salt Lake City, Utah

Old Warehouse – Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Safety Building - Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Safety Building – Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Safety Building - Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Safety Building – Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library - Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library – Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library - Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library – Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library - Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City Public Library – Salt Lake City, Utah


Pacemaker Crown Graphic (1955)

You know the saying, “the first drug is always free?” That’s how my friend Maurice convinced me to experiment with large format. Late last year, he asked me if I would be interested in trying one of his Graflex cameras. He even sweetened the deal by loading some Arista 4×5 film into the film holders, and volunteered to develop them. On a Saturday morning, he gave me hands-on lesson and answered all my questions.

Maurice & Shaun - Photo by Charles Trentelman

Maurice & Shaun – Photo by Charles Trentelman

The Pacemaker Crown Graphic was manufactured from 1947 to 1973 by Graflex Inc. Made of mahogany wood and metal, the Pacemaker has a side-mounted rangefinder focus, but does not have a focal plane shutter like nearly identical Pacemaker Speed Graphic. To give the camera access to a variety of wide-angle lenses, and to reduce the overall weight, it was made without a focal plane shutter. My Pacemaker was manufactured in 1955 and features a lens board with a 135mm Graflex Optar lens, f/4.7 – 32, and shutter speeds 1/400 – 1 sec.

Photographers often describe their satisfaction of shooting film as: it allows me to slow down. Using a large format camera, like a Graflex, takes that same notion and multiplies it. Everything from setting the camera up to the final click of the shutter is a deliberate, leisurely, and enjoyable process.

After shooting the film that Maurice had loaded, I returned the camera and film holders to him. He told me that he was likely going to sell the Pacemaker and offered it to me. A few days later, I returned and bought the camera from him. Maurice also threw in the book,  Graphic Graflex Photography: The Master Book for the Larger Camera (1943), 8 film holders, and a Polaroid 100-series Packfilm holder. Adding to my new large format arsenal, I bought the SP-445 Compact 4×5 Film Processing System, along with New55 Atomic-X and Kodak T-Max film. For me, developing black and white 4×5 sheets are easier than 35 or 120. And it’s exciting to see a large 4×5 negative with so much detail. Compared to a digital camera sensor, a single sheet of 4×5 film provides more “data” than you can possibly imagine. Learning with some additional practice, I plan to create more 4×5 images with better composition and depth of field. However, I am happy with my first attempt with large format photography.