Tag Archives: Vintage

Film Photowalk: Annual ‘No Show’ Air-Cooled VW Show

For the past three years I’ve tried to think of ways to organize a photowalk with other film photographers. The annual VW ‘No Show’ is one of my favorite car shows. Not because I’m a car guy, or a Volkswagen fan. It’s just a fun car show that’s not too big, or too small. The VW owners are fun to talk with, and they enjoy having their cars photographed. Mark your calendar and save the date!

11th Annual VW No Show - Kaysville, Utah

 

13th Annual ‘No Show’ Air-Cooled VW & Vintage Bicycle Gathering

Date: Saturday 18 August 2018

Start Time: 09:00 AM – Meet under the trees on the north-east corner of the park.

Estimated Duration: 2.0 hours

Country: United States

Start: 200 West Main Street (Bishop Field), Kaysville, UT, USA

On this photowalk, we’ll have the opportunity to photograph classic air-cooled Volkswagen’s and vintage bicycles. Please register for this photowalk at PhotoWalk.Me. By registering, you’ll receive updates on the photowalk, and can connect with other photographers to make carpool arrangements. Make sure to bring your favorite film camera(s) (or any camera), tripod, sunscreen, and water. More information on the show can be found on the VooDoo Kruizerz Facebook Page.

 

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Expired, Retired, and Still Fired – Part 2

Camera: Yashica Electro 35 GS (1970 – 1973)
Film: Kodak Tri-X 400 (Expired 6/10) bought at Goodwill for $.99
Process: RepliColor, Salt Lake City, UT
Scanner: Epson Perfection V600 Photo

 

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Yashica Electro 35 GS

The Electro 35 GS was the third generation of Electro automatic rangefinder cameras made by Yashica from 1970 -1972. The Electro GS features a sharp Yashinon f/1.7 – 16, 45mm lens. A CdS cell on the front-left of the camera detects the amount of light and alerts you on the top of the camera and in the viewfinder. The yellow light on top of the camera, yellow left-arrow in the viewfinder, indicates the image will be under-exposed and requires a slow shutter speed. The red light, red right-arrow in the viewfinder, indicates the image will be over-exposed and requires a faster shutter speed. The camera sensing the light will automatically set the shutter speed, allowing the photographer to set the aperture. Overall, a super easy-to-use aperture priority camera.

The Electro 35 GS was given to me as a gift from my good friend, Mike Williams, in North Carolina. Mike discovered the Electro series and raved about them, so much that he bought himself a second and sent me this camera. I replaced the seals and was anxious to give it a try. Mike was also nice enough to send along a roll of Ilford Delta 100 film. We have an unofficial wager as to what’s the better rangefinder: Minolta Hi-Matic 7S (1966), Yashica Electro 35 GS (1970), or the Canon Canonet G-III QL17 (1972).

To test the Electro, I spent a Saturday morning at the Vee-Dub Club of Northern Utah Air Cooled Volkswagen No Show in Kaysville. It’s the non-show of summer car shows showcasing some of the best, and worst, air cooled Beetle’s, buses, and buggies. I’ve never owned a VW, but it’s a fun show.

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Camera Collection

For the past month I’ve been running test film through various cameras so I can share the results here. This week, I want to show off some of the most recent additions to my collection.
 

Yashica A - 120 Film (1959 - 1969)Yashica A – 120 Film (1959 – 1969)

 

Pentax Spotmatic - 35mm Film (1964 - 1973)Pentax Spotmatic – 35mm Film (1964 – 1973)

 

Nikon EM - 35mm Film (1979 - 1982)Nikon EM – 35mm Film (1979 – 1982)

 

Pentax ME Super - 35mm Film (1980 - 1986)Pentax ME Super – 35mm Film (1980 – 1986)

 

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