Tag Archives: Color Film

Minolta XG7 (1977)

This camera was given to me by a coworker whose father owned it. I was told his father had another Minolta, accidently dropped it, and was told it would be cheaper to buy a new camera than have the repairs done. The XG7 is what he upgraded to. He gave me the camera with an awesome 50mm Rokkor-X f/1.4 lens, a Minolta Autowinder G, and a Quataray 85-210mm zoom lens. This camera and all the accessories are in fantastic condition. Normally, when I get a camera this old, I usually expect to replace the light seals or the mirror bumper, but not this camera. There’s no stickiness or crumbling foam.

The Minolta XG was the budget line or entry-level camera to Minolta’s XD series. Both the XD and XG series of cameras came after the SRT line from the late 1960’s. The Minolta XG7 (XG-E or XG2 in other markets) has the Minolta Bayonet MD lens mount, shutter speeds of 1 – 1/1000th second with bulb, TTL central zone CdS metering, and a hotshoe with PC X-Sync.

In 1977, the XG body and 50mm lens sold for $289 at B&H. That’s about $1200 today. For an entry-level camera, that’s a lot of money for 1977. From the information I’ve looked through on The Rokkor Files, I think this version of the 50mm Rokkor-X f/1.4 was made in 1979. The original owner must have purchased it a year or two after buying the body. And because this is a Bayonet MD mount lens, it’s highly sought after by digital mirrorless photographers.

The body of the XG7 is small, like a Pentax ME Super or Pentax Super Program, and is covered with a synthetic leather that has started to shrink a bit. One unique feature of the XG7 is the electromagnetic touch shutter button. This is the first time I’ve used one. How does it work? You lightly touch your finger on the shutter button, and the meter activates. The camera has aperture priority and manual modes. However, I’ve found that the autowinder only works in aperture priority mode and allows you shoot at 2 frames per second.

The viewfinder is bright and has LEDs on the right-hand side to show your shutter speed. The LEDs also have an up triangle above 1/1000th and a down triangle below 1 second to indicated that you are over or under-exposed. The LEDs in the viewfinder are bright but tend to jump around a bit as you place your finger on the electromagnetic shutter.

What this camera doesn’t have are some of the pro features that were included on the XD series. Things like depth of field preview, mirror lockup, and standard cable release. Because of the electromagnetic touch on the shutter, a cable release must be screwed into the side of the lens mount.

This camera requires batteries to operate the film advance and shutter. If you’re looking to buy one and the seller doesn’t think the shutter works, or they say it’s not been tested, there’s a good chance the camera doesn’t have fresh batteries. That’s another feature of the XG7. It takes two standard LR44 1.5v batteries.

The XG7 is one of those unknown cameras that pass by a lot of photographers. It doesn’t get much love compared to Pentax, Nikon and Canon’s from the late 70’s. You can usually find an XG7 on eBay starting at about $22 with a 50mm lens. And Minolta MD Bayonet mount Rokkor lenses have a reputation for being sharp.

Overall, I enjoy using the XG7. I like the size of the camera. Even with the autowinder, it’s not overly bulky or heavy. The body weighs 20 ounces.

Camera: Minolta XG7 (1977)
Film: Agfa Vista 200
Process: RepliColor SLC
Scanned: Epson V600 Photo

 

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Nikkor 35 – 200mm f/3.5 – 4.5s

Camera: Nikon F2 Photomic (1971). Lens: Nikkor 35 - 200mm f/3.5 - 22 - Macro.

I’ve really enjoyed shooting with the Nikon F2 Photomic (1971 – 1980), so I thought I’d like another lens. Since shooting film, I’ve gained a new appreciation for fixed prime lenses. The zoom lenses for older film cameras don’t appeal to me, but I wanted to give this one a shot (pun intended). Released in 1985, the Nikkor 35 – 200mm f/3.5 – 4.5s is a zoom lens with an Ai-S lens coupling, 17 glass elements in 13 groups, and apertures from f/3.5 to f/22. It also has a macro button that allows the lens to focus as close as 0.3m, about 12 inches.

These shots were taken at Red Butte Garden in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July 24th. Being a state holiday, the garden offered free admission for the day. My wife and I took advantage of the day off and headed up to the east bench of the valley to enjoy some colorful landscapes. Keep in mind, I’m not much of a landscape or macro flower photographer. My intent was to test the lens and see if it was something I liked. I found myself fumbling when composing shots. First, trying to zoom, and then focus, while checking the meter, etc. That says more about me as a photographer than issues with the lens. Maybe a larger learning curve than I thought, so not enjoyable at my first attempt. It’s like Scott Bourne says, “99% of the lenses are 100% better than the photographers.” Slightly off topic, next to Kodak Ektar, Agfa Vista is my favorite color film for saturated bright colors. It’s disappointing that Agfa Vista has been discontinued. I’m happy with the results from a technical standpoint. The images show some soft grain where I think it should be. When the lens is opened to f/3.5, it grabs a nice slice of focus. I think the ultimate test for this lens would be portraits, and that’s what I plan to try next.

Camera: Nikon F2 Photomic (1971)
Lens: Nikkor 35 – 200mm f/3.5 – 4.5s
Film: Agfa Vista 200

 


Pentax ME Super

Another great thrift store find from 2015 was the Pentax ME Super. I actually bought two of them in one week by accident. The second came from a local pawn shop. I gave it to a friend’s 8-year old son as a gift when our family traveled to Portland, Oregon. I’ve detailed some of the features below, but found that my fellow blogger and film enthusiast, Simon Hawketts, has done a great job detailing the specs on his site.

The Pentax ME Super was manufactured from 1980 to 1986, and is the younger, newer sibling to the Pentax ME and MV models. Both of these prior models are all automatic and have no manual modes. The ME Super has aperture priority, manual, 125X and bulb modes. The ME Super features a focal plane shutter with speeds from f/4 to 1/2000. The exposure meter is an open aperture TTL center weighted type that is displayed in the viewfinder with a series of LED’s. The ISO range is 12 to 1600. The lens paired with my ME Super is a SMC Pentax K bayonet mount, 50mm f/2 lens. Overall, the ME Super is a great camera. At the time, it was Pentax’s smallest and lightest SLR at 440g.

Before I started tracking my cameras loaded with film with the Film Roll app on my iPhone, I had forgotten that my ME Super was loaded. There’s a large gap in time between the first group of shots and the end of the roll. They start in early spring and end of Veteran’s Day. For my testing, I shot a roll of Lomography Color 400.

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