Tag Archives: FP-3000B

Step5 Polaroid Print Holder

I love using my Polaroid Land Cameras. Instant photography is the drug that brought me to shooting film. As much as I enjoy it, there are two problems when shooting peel-apart 100-series Fujifilm (FP-100C Color or FB-3000B Black & White). The first issue is dust and debris that can stick to a freshly peeled image. The micro particles don’t appear on the slightly wet print, but will appear when the image is scanned. The solution is to place the print in an environment so it can dry, dust and hair-free. The second issue with peel-apart film is what to do with the print. When I’m shooting, I’m always looking for a way to keep my photos from being damaged; folded, wrinkled, or sticking to other prints.

The Step5 Polaroid Print Holder is a 3D printed film holder that can store ten Fujifilm instant photos securely. Inside the holder are small groves that allow each print to slide inside. The spacing of the groves prevents prints from touching each other during storage. The print holder is small enough to fit anywhere in a camera bag. And it’s strong enough so prints won’t be crushed or folded.

Pros: The Step5 Print Holder keeps prints protected. Photos are evenly spaced and don’t come in contact with each other. The print holder is 3D printed at high density making the plastic strong and crush-proof. As a bonus, the gray coloring of the holder matches vintage Polaroid accessories. I’m not sure if this was done on purpose, but it works.

Cons: Because the holder is 3D printed, the open end of the holder is rough plastic. I found that I couldn’t insert my prints into the holder smoothly. To resolve this, I took some fine grain sandpaper and inserted it into each grove and that was enough to remove some of the plastic burs. This wouldn’t be an issue if the holder was created using plastic injected molding.

The Step5 Polaroid Print Holder is now available for $30.00 (USD) plus $6 for shipping ($15 international) from PhotOle Photography. They also have a new negative holder for photographers like me that keep our peel-apart negatives for bleaching (color) and scanning. The larger groves provide additional space to keep negatives from sticking to each other. It’s now available for $40.00 (USD) plus $6 for shipping ($15 international).

 


Polaroid Land Camera 250

One of my favorite cameras is also the first instant film camera I purchased in October 2013. The Polaroid Land Camera 250, manufactured from 1967 – 1969, is a high-end model with a Zeiss Ikon rangefinder focus. The focus is projected in a single viewfinder window unlike other models made during the time. The camera itself has an all metal body, a tripod mount, and contains a 3-element glass lens (114mm f/8.8).

Polaroid Land Camera 250
During the three year production, Polaroid made some slight changes to the model 250. Early version have a much larger viewfinder/focus window. Many collectors and photographers prefer this version because of the viewfinder. Another noticeable difference in the early version is the classic Polaroid logo. It features the name Polaroid on the front cover with the original crossing polarizer lens logo on the top. In later versions, the viewfinder/focus window was reduced in size, though it was functionally identical. The polarizer logo was removed and the name Polaroid was moved on the cover and the camera model was added. From this point forward, this was the standard location for the name and model. I currently own the later version of the 250. Last year I purchased a box of mystery cameras from an auction house in San Diego, California. One of the cameras in the box was an early version of the 250. I cleaned it up, lubricated the moving parts, and converted the batteries. It wasn’t difficult to find a buyer.

Since 2014, I’ve collected seven other Polaroid Land Cameras that use the 100-Serial Type Pack Film. Each camera has been cleaned and had the batteries converted to standard AA’s or AAA’s depending on the model. I’ve even purchased a few duplicates and given them away to friends. In November 2013, Rich Legg and I were messing around with our instant cameras at his studio in Draper, Utah. Rich wired an old flash cable so we could connect our Land Camera’s to Pocket Wizards. This allowed us to use our instant cameras with his giant octobox and studio strobes. It was cool to mix a 45-year old camera with modern wireless triggers and studio lighting.

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