Kodak No. 1 Panoram

This week we’re featuring a guest post from Maurice Greeson. I’ve come to know Maurice from visiting the Ogden Union Station Restoration Shop in Ogden, Utah. Each week, members of The Golden Spike Chapter of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society volunteer time restoring, Denver & Rio Grande Western railroad steam locomotive #223 to an operational engine. Maurice is a talented photographer with a vast collection of vintage cameras. You can see more of his work on Flickr. Maurice has a Kodak No. 1 Panoram camera that was manufactured by Kodak from 1900 – 1926 and cost $10. This Model-D was made around 1915. A 6-exposure 2 1/4 x 7 film cartridge was $.40 or you could use a 3-exposure cartridge that was $.20.

Kodak No. 1 Panoram

Kodak No. 1 Panoram

The steam locomotive is No. 223, an 1881 Grant loco currently under restoration at Ogden’s Union Station. Photo by Maurice Greeson.

The steam locomotive is No. 223, an 1881 Grant loco currently under restoration at Ogden’s Union Station. Photo by Maurice Greeson.

This was shot on April 24th, 2015 at The Union Station, Ogden, Utah, with a one hundred year old Kodak No. 1 Panoram camera.   I’ve had this camera sitting on the shelf for a few years and finally decided to try it out. I’m not sure where or when I acquired it. (Old cameras seem to float in and out of my life) Originally using Kodak No. 105 roll film it seemed a perfect candidate to modify for 120. Too easy! All that was necessary was to file down a slightly protruding metal piece in the bottom of the supply chamber. It also helped to sand down the plastic Fuji 120 spool on one end. (The older metal 120 spools could be a problem) The next thing was to figure out the number spacing. Since the negatives from the Kodak are 7” long it wasn’t too hard to figure out that 2,5,10, & 14 would work. I just laid out a discarded paper backing from a 120 roll film and saw that the numbers for shooting 16 shots with a 1 5/8” x 2 ¼” camera would be under the red window. Although touted by Kodak as being able to shoot hand held, I used a tripod.   Keeping the camera level is a good thing although shooting up or at an angle might give some interesting effects. I still haven’t figured out the shutter speeds or f/stop, but the simple meniscus lens does a pretty nice job on a sunny day. This is a fun camera to use, even if it is a bit fiddly. You have to cock the lens by moving a lever on the top of the camera to the left or to the right. Pressing the release button lets the lens swing to give you the 112 degree picture. The only down side is that it costs about $1.25 per exposure. Shot with Fuji Acros negative film size 120 and developed in a home brewed MQ developer. Yup… D76!   If you haven’t tried making up your own developer from scratch just give it a try. There are only four chemicals in D76! The steam locomotive is No. 223, an 1881 Grant loco currently under restoration at Ogden’s Union Station.

 

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About Shaun Nelson

Learning to shoot analog in a digital world. UtahFilmPhotography.com is dedicated to sharing information, sharing experience and sharing knowledge about film photography and vintage cameras. View all posts by Shaun Nelson

One response to “Kodak No. 1 Panoram

  • Jim Grey

    This is fascinating. At the church I attend we have a bunch of panoramic photos of the congregation in front of the building, taken in the teens and 20s. I always wondered what kind of gear took these photos — and now I know it could have been one of these cameras!

    Like

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