Author Archives: Shaun Nelson

About Shaun Nelson

Learning to shoot analog in a digital world. UtahFilmPhotography.com is dedicated to sharing information, sharing experience and sharing knowledge about film photography and vintage cameras.

Recently Abandoned

This summer, I spent an afternoon at two recently abandoned places with my Nikon F2 and a roll of Kodak Ektar. On the occasion that I shoot color film, I like the saturated colors of Ektar and the way it renders red, orange and green.

The house and pool in the images are a piece of property purchased last year by the Utah Department of Transportation. Several homes along US 89 in Fruit Heights, Kaysville and Layton in Davis County will be demolished because of a highway expansion project.

Raging Waters in Salt Lake City was operated under a contract starting in 2011 with Seven Peaks Resorts. The contract however expired in early 2019 and the owners decided not to re-open and the water park was abandoned. I know a few skaters that would love to trespass on this property.

Camera: Nikon F2 Photomic (1971)
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Process: CineStill C41 Kit
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 

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Haunted? Stricker Ranch – Hansen, Idaho

In 2019, I’ve tried to spend more time shooting film than writing. I’m finding myself returning to some of my favorite cameras and film stocks. This post is more about the destination and the subject than the gear or film. I thought it was worth sharing.

Over Memorial Day weekend, my family took a short road trip to Twin Falls, Idaho. Our first destination was Stricker Ranch/Rock Creek Station, in Hansen Idaho. I learned about the Stricker Ranch while looking for some ghost towns to visit that were within a few hours drive from home. Stricker Ranch, also known as the Rock Creek Station, was built along the Oregon Trail in 1865 and was one of the stops west of Fort Hall, Idaho. It was also home to the Overland mail stage route and the Kelton Freight Road. The remains of the ranch, or town, are currently being preserved by the Idaho State Historical Society and non-profit Friends of Stricker, Inc. The ranch and buildings are rumored to be haunted by friendly spirits. You’ll need to visit and decide for yourself. Many of ranch structures have been lost to time, but the original store, wet cellar, and Stricker home remain standing. The buildings and Stricker home are only open on Sundays for a few hours, but self-guided tours via markers and maps onsite are available year-round. The Stricker home is surrounded by beautiful shade trees and landscaping, making it a perfect place for a picnic, or séance, whatever you decide.

Camera: Leica M3 (1959)
Film: Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Process: RepliColor, SLC
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 

 


The 2nd Annual Negative Positives Podcast Double-Exposure Challenge Photo Zine

The 2nd Annual Negative Positives Podcast Double-Exposure Challenge Photo Zine

 


Kosmo Foto Mono 120

Yashica Mat-124 G

When Stephen Dowling at Kosmo Foto announced the new Kosmo Foto Mono 120, I rushed to preorder several rolls. Why? Kosmo Foto Mono has been one of my favorite films. You can read my original review here, and view more photos here.

Kosmo Foto Mono is a fantastic ISO 100 black and white film. Just like the 135-36, the 120 medium format version has a nice balance of grain and contrast. I’m really looking forward to shooting more in my Yashica Mat-124 G.

Over Memorial Day weekend, we took a drive north to Twin Falls, Idaho. It was a stormy, cloudy, rainy day. However, each time we stepped out of the car, it stopped raining long enough for us to enjoy ourselves. Our first stop was Stricker Ranch in Hansen, Idaho. This ranch and homestead date back to 1865 and was one of the stops along the Oregon Trail. Then we drove on to Shoshone Falls outside of Twin Falls. With plenty of winter snow and spring rain, the roaring waterfall was incredible. I was able to created a panoramic shot of the falls with two 6×6 shots, stitching them in Lightroom. And then we stopped to walk along the Perrine Bridge in Twin Falls.

Camera: Yashica Mat-124 G
Film: Kosmo Foto Mono 120
Process: RepliColor, SLC
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 


The 2nd Annual Negative Positives Film Photography Podcast Double-Exposure Challenge

This year I organized another double-exposure challenge for The Negative Positives Film Photography Podcast. Using some of the lessons learned from last year, I decided to simplify the challenge, and give photographers deadlines. The concept of the double-exposure challenge: one photographer shoots a roll of film, rewinds the film, and then sends it to someone else, who then shoots on the same roll. Listeners of the podcast signed up via a Google form and filled out their preferences to shoot black & white or color 35mm film. Something new this year, hosts from other film photography podcasters were also challenged to participate.

My partner for the Double-Exposure Challenge was Ben Mills from Buckinghamshire in the United Kingdom. Ben runs an awesome website that connects photographers with film. If you have a stash of film that you’re not going to shoot, but want to trade it with someone that has something you’d use, Ben’s website can hook you up. Ben provided a roll of Fujifilm Acros 100 black & white film, and shot the roll around London. Me and Ben also decided to use the same camera body, hoping for a better chance to line up our double-exposed images. And it worked for the first half of the roll, but eventually drifted towards the end. The camera we both used was the Minolta X-700 (1983). These are some of my favorite images.

Photographer #1
Ben Mills
Buckinghamshire, UK
Camera: Minolta X-700

Photographer #2
Shaun Nelson
South Ogden, UT USA
Camera: Minolta X-700

Camera: Minolta X-700 (1983)
Film: Fujifilm Acros 100
Process: RepliColor, SLC
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 


Minolta X-700

I’ve been looking to buy a Minolta X-700 for a few years. I passed on a few of them because I thought they were overpriced. However, last month I found one in an antique store for $20. I believe they thought it was broken. With a set of new batteries, light seals, and some cleaning, the camera works great! This is one of the few cameras that my friend Mike Williams has raved about for a few years now. He likes this camera so much; he bought a backup. And he’s been eager to hear my thoughts on the X-700.

Minolta X-700

The Minolta X-700 was released in 1981 and was the top of the line from the X-series of cameras, boasting the largest number of accessories and part of the MPS (Minolta Program System). Initially produced in Japan, and then manufactured in China, the X-700 was produced from 1981 to 1999. While the X-700 was sold as a professional camera, it gained popularity with both amateurs and pros because of the camera’s Program mode. The Program mode made use of camera’s electronics, automating the camera, making it a high-end point and shoot, with perfect exposures every shot. The X-700 has three modes: Programmed Automatic Exposure, Aperture-Priority Automatic Exposure and Full Metered Manual Exposure Mode. During my testing, I stayed in the aperture-priority mode because I like control over my depth of field. I spend about 80% of my time shooting in AP on most cameras.

You can find dozens of X-700 reviews online, so I’m going to touch on a few features and specs. Like the Minolta XG I tested last year, the X-700 has the electromagnetic touch shutter button. Resting a finger on the shutter button activates the meter that is displayed by LED lights in the viewfinder. The camera features shutter speeds from 1 second to 1/1000th of a sec, plus bulb mode. The main power switch lets you select if you want audible beeps from the camera, indicating the shutter speed is 1/30th or slower. The camera has a silicon photocell through the lens, center weighted metering. Made of plastic with a metal frame, it weighs 505 grams, a little over 1 pound without a lens.

Overall, the X-700 is a fun camera to shoot with. The features are on a professional level, but the camera is simple to operate. It feels balanced in my hands. The plastic molded grip reminds me of the Canon A-1. Minolta MD lenses have a solid reputation of being sharp. The only downside to this camera that I can think of are the electronics. How well do electronics age? I think the only reason Konica-Minolta abandoned the X-700 was photographer’s preference for autofocus lenses in the mid 1980’s.

Camera: Minolta X-700 (1981)
Film: Fomapan 100 Classic
Process: Kodak D76 (1+1) 10:00 Min @ 20°
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 


Holga 120 WPC

The Holga Wide Pinhole camera was released in 2008, but hasn’t been produced for a number of years. Despite its plastic cheap feel you expect from a Holga, it’s gained a reputation for being a good pinhole camera. Over the last few months they’ve appeared twice on Amazon. Mike Gutterman of the Negative Positives Film Photography Podcast became aware of this and shared it with both the Negative Positive Podcast Facebook group, and the Lensless Podcast Facebook group. I ignored it the first time it came up but took the bait the second time it appeared. I’m blaming this purchase on Mike.

The camera itself features an f/125 aperture, and dual 0.3mm pinholes. The horizontal exposure can give you a maximum wide 120 degree shot on 120 film. The camera comes with two masks that can be inserted, allowing you to shoot 8 frames at 6 x 9, or a slightly wider 6 frames at 6 x 12. On the top of the camera you’ll find a spirit level and lines that represent your viewfinder. Because it’s a Holga, I used gaffer tape to keep the camera closed after loading the film. I also put a strip over the red exposure window on the back. The shutter button allows you to connect a standard threaded shutter release cable.

For my first roll, I shot some Kodak Verichrome Pan that expired in September 1989 and decided to use the 6 x 9 mask in the camera. After my first three shots, I remembered that I was shooting wide and needed to skip every other frame. The first three images created a unique overlapping double-exposure. The Holga 120 WPC is fun to use. I’m happy with my initial shots and looking forward to shooting more pinhole.

Camera: Holga 120 WPC
Film: Kodak Verichrome Pan (Expired 9/1989)
Process: Kodak D76 (1+1) 10:00 Min @ 20°
Scanner: Epson V600 Photo

 

 


Classic Advertisements

Recently my friend Maurice has been on a book and magazine purge. I’ve brought home several boxes with interesting contents. Some of those items made their way from Utah to Natalie Smart in the UK. Make sure to check out her site NatalieSmartFilmPhotography.com. Some of the items acquired from Maurice were old international photography magazines. These are some 1950 & 1951 UK magazine advertisements I would classify as classics.

Ferrania Film

Ilford

Ferrania Film

Anatomical Manikins

Agiflex II

 


Coca-Cola Polar Bear Camera

Coca-Cola began using polar bears for print advertising in 1922. And the polar bears would appear occasionally in printed advertisements over the next seventy years. It wasn’t until 1992 that advertising professional Ken Stewart gave life to the Coca-Cola polar bears in the popular Northern Lights television commercial in February 1993. The Coke polar bears were one of the first digitally animated advertising campaigns. The television commercials featuring the polar bears touched on the emotion and magic that many of Coca-Cola’s previous ad campaigns had done. Starting in 1993, the Coca-Cola Polar Bears from the “Always Coca-Cola” (admit it, you just sang that in your head) series of advertisements and many more successful marketing campaigns came complete with matching Coke merchandise.

Coca-Cola Polar Bear Camera

Manufactured in 1999, the Coca-Cola Polar Bear Camera could be purchased in a Coca-Cola collector tin or bought by itself in a sealed plastic clamshell package. The camera came with two AA batteries and a roll of Kodak Max 400 color film, a Coke branded camera case, and camera strap. The camera is a simple point-and-shoot, with no special features other than being automatic and motorized. Sliding the polar bear, holding his beverage of choice, to the side reveals what I’m guessing to be a 35mm f/5.6 lens. The camera automatically senses light and fires the flash if needed. The top of the camera features a frame counter and a switch to rewind the film. The shutter is triggered by pressing the Coca-Cola bottle cap.

This camera was given to me last Christmas by my oldest son, Caleb. My initial test was an incredibly expired roll of Kodak Gold 400. The roll was not stored in a box, so I don’t know the expiration date, but the shifting colors are a good indicator that it was past its prime. I developed this roll with the CineStill C-41 one quart developing kit. I like quirky branded toy cameras like the Coca-Cola Polar Bear Camera. I wish they would make a camera featuring my preferred drink, Coke Zero.

 


The 2nd Annual Negative Positives Podcast Double-Exposure Challenge

Negative Positives Film Photography Podcast

One again, I’ve organized a double-exposure challenge for the Negative Positives Podcast Film Photography Podcast.

What is the double-exposure challenge? Two photographers shoot and expose the same roll of film. How do you participate? Sign up in the Google form (link below) and we’ll match you with another photographer. This year you’ll have the choice to shoot 35mm color or black & white film. You get to chose if you want to be the first or second person to shoot the film, and you’ll select (if you’re the first shooter) if your willing to send the film to another photographer in another country.

The first person to shoot the roll of film:

1) Supplies the roll of film.
2) Shoots the entire roll of film.
3) Mails the finished roll to a matched partner.

The second person to shoot the roll of film:

1) Shoots the entire roll of film.
2) Develops the film or has it processed at a lab.
3) Scans the roll of film or has it scanned at a lab.
4) Shares the resulting images with his/her matched partner.

Plus, if you are a podcaster, you can participate in this challenge with another solo podcaster, or one of your podcast co-hosts.

Here are some important deadlines that you need to know:

April 1, 2019: Registration for the NPP 2nd Annual Double-Exposure Challenge begins.

April 17, 2019: Registration for the NPP 2nd Annual Double-Exposure Challenge ends.

April 22, 2019: Each participant will receive an email with an assigned double-exposure partner.

April 28, 2019: Submissions for Double-Exposure Contest begin.

May 31, 2019: Submission for the Double-Exposure Contest ends.

June 14, 2019: The 2nd Annual NPP Double-Exposure Challenge Zine available.

June/July: Mike and Andre will critique and judge images that have been submitted for the Double-Exposure Contest.

After you’ve been matched with another photographer (4/22/19), you’re encouraged to communicate with your assigned partner to share your visual ideas on your final images. For example: Are we going to shoot strictly in landscape or portrait orientation? Will one of us under-expose or over-expose the images? Will we concentrate on a specific subject? How concerned are we with lining up each frame?

The Negative Positives Double-Exposure Challenge was created to be a fun event for photographers that share the love of film and The Negative Positives Podcast.

Communicate, shoot, share, and have fun!

 

Click here to sign up as an individual to be matched with another film photographer.

Click here if you are a podcaster and would like to shoot with another podcaster or podcast co-host.