Ferrania P30 Alpha

Olympus OM-1N MD (1979) & Ferrania P30 Alpha

The resurrection of Italy’s Film Ferrania from 2014 is an ongoing process. While preparing for full scale production of their 100 ASA color reversal film products, they’ve released an 80 ISO panchromatic black & white motion picture film for still photography. P30 is based on Ferrania’s high silver content film from the 1960’s. The film was released as an Alpha product in limited quantities, giving Kickstarter backers the option to change their backing to P30 film, wait for the color film, or keep the color film and purchase P30 early at a discount.

I kept my original backing, purchased the max limit of 5 rolls, and decided to develop the film myself. While placing the film on a Patterson reel, the edges of the film at the sprockets cracked, twice. This is what I expect from old film, not new. And though Ferrania has published and updated a data sheet of best practices for developing this film, there still seems to be a bit of guesswork involved. I developed mine in Kodak D-76 with a dilution of 1:1 for 13 minutes at 20° C. After developing, I found that this film scratches very easy. And it’s almost impossible to determine which side of the film is the emulsion side, making scanning difficult. My resulting images are high contrast, like I’ve seen online from other photographers. Keeping that in mind, I knew what I was getting into with an alpha product. These are the best that came from my 36-exposure roll.

 

Massive Dev Chart App - P30 Developing Time

Camera: Olympus OM-1N MD (1979)
Film: Ferrania P30 Alpha
Process: Kodak D-76 (1+1) 13:00 @ 20 C
Scanner: Epson Perfection V600 Photo

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About Shaun Nelson

Learning to shoot analog in a digital world. UtahFilmPhotography.com is dedicated to sharing information, sharing experience and sharing knowledge about film photography and vintage cameras. View all posts by Shaun Nelson

5 responses to “Ferrania P30 Alpha

  • Jim Grey

    Yours is the first P30 experience report I’ve read that describes the processing experience. Interesting it was so challenging. I’ve shot one of my five rolls and had Old School Photo Lab process it, and I got high-contrast results too. Your car interior shots and the shot of the valve look representative of what my first roll all looked like. Funny, I haven’t found a good reason to shoot another roll of the stuff. I liked it, but I just keep going back to my standby films.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ludwigvan66

      My first roll came off of the cassette while putting on the Patterson reel. Not really a problem, but it made me aware that I shouldn’t try to eek out that last frame in my camera by winding a little extra. I haven’t noticed it scratching easily. I’ve scanned 3 rolls that required almost zero spotting in PS. I like the look of it myself, but I shoot it at 50iso. I’ve got a few examples posted here… https://flic.kr/s/aHskZf2RPo

      Liked by 1 person

    • Shaun Nelson

      Like you, I’m in no rush to shoot the other rolls. Mike Williams had Old School develop his P30, too. His was incredibly contrasty. Some people like that look, but I don’t think it’s for me. One recommendation that was given to me on the FB P30 group page was to diluite D-76 1:3 to remove the contrast. I haven’t decided if I’m going to try that or not. Seems easier to shoot it at a different ISO like ludwigvan66 said.

      Like

  • Mike

    Yeah, I had Old School process mine. I like them…..but I didn’t really like my P30 shots. Maybe 5 or 6 on the roll I actually liked. Honestly, not sure if I’d buy this film again. As a matter of fact, I gave away my last roll of it to someone wanting to try it.

    Like

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