Landscape Photography with the Mamiya m645 Super

It’s been a snowy and cold start to the new year and I’m already behind updating UTFP. Searching back through my catalog of film images, I decided to share these from June 2015. The Mamiya m645 Super with the 80mm f/2.8 lens is not ideal for landscape photography. Stopping down the lens, like you would expect to do when creating a landscape image, closes out much of the light in the viewfinder. As I stated in my early review on the Mamiya m645 Super, I found the best solution was to focus, stop down (f/16 or f/22), check the meter, set the shutter speed, and then take the shot. Even outdoors in bright sunlight, f/22 is very dark through the viewfinder. These images were shot on Lomography Color 100, processed by TheDarkroom.com, and scanned on my Epson Perfection V600 Photo.

Chesterfield is located between Lava Hot Springs and Soda Springs, Idaho. The town was settled in 1880 by Chester Call and his family along the Oregon Trail. Some of the homes and buildings have been restored, some are in the process of being restored, and others have been abandoned.

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About Shaun Nelson

Learning to shoot analog in a digital world. UtahFilmPhotography.com is dedicated to sharing information, sharing experience and sharing knowledge about film photography and vintage cameras. View all posts by Shaun Nelson

2 responses to “Landscape Photography with the Mamiya m645 Super

  • Russell

    Nice! I really want to get me a Mamiya 645 of some flavor.

    Like

  • ehpem

    These came out really well. I have just been experimenting with this film, but the first roll I managed to load backwards and thus exposed the backing paper! That’s what I get for not using the camera for a few months.

    Do you have the metering prism for your M645 Super? I have been contemplating getting one for mine.

    My 80/2.8 N and 55/2.8 N lenses both have a lever on the base of the lens on left side for A and M depth of field settings, which clears the view for focussing at smaller apertures. Much like on the M42 Takumar lenses. In your other post I think I can just see the lever on the lens right up against the camera body and more or less aligned with the hot shoe.

    Like

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